Film Series: Runs & Limited Engagements

The Seagull

2018, Michael Mayer, USA, 98 min. With Annette Bening, Saoirse Ronan, Elisabeth Moss, Corey Stoll.

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Show Times

  • Fri, Jul 13th 4:00pm
  • Fri, Jul 13th 8:00pm
  • Sat, Jul 14th 3:00pm
  • Sun, Jul 15th 5:00pm
  • Mon, Jul 16th 8:00pm
  • Tue, Jul 17th 8:15pm
  • Wed, Jul 18th 6:00pm
  • Thu, Jul 19th 6:00pm

"A landmark adaptation that brings out the play's humor in a way that hasn't been done before." - Josephine Livingstone, The New Republic

"The film never feels like a filmed stage productio; it's dynamic and unstuffy, beautifully shot and wonderfully accessible...Every single actor dazzles in their role." - Dana Schwartz, Entertainment Weekly

"The Seagull" was a disaster when first performed in 1896; only after Stanislavsky's naturalistic 1898 production was it acknowledged as a masterpiece, the first of Chekhov's four theatrical landmarks. Set at a lakeside manor outside Moscow, the plot is a roundelay of ironically misplaced love: The self-centered stage diva Irina arrives with her younger lover, the celebrated short-story writer Trigorin. Irina's would-be playwright son Konstantin is infatuated with the ambitious young actress Nina, who sets her sights on the more influential Trigorin, while Masha, the daughter of the estate-manager, is pined after by the schoolteacher Medvedenko but only has eyes for Konstantin. Tony-winning director Mayer ("Spring Awakening") and Tony-winning playwright Stephen Karam ("The Humans") fashion an adaptation that is intimate, sensual, brisk, and non-stagey. The action (filmed in lovely upstate New York locations) is opened up over lake, meadows, and forest, and infused with a palpable sense of summer (and romantic) heat. The mobile camera stays close to the actors, and the quick pace sharpens the comic shadings in Chekhov's tragicomic vision. The cast is uniformly superb, led by three great actresses: Bening's grande-dame performance as Irina has been called definitive by critics; Ronan is radiant as the not-so-innocent ingénue Nina; and Moss nearly steals the show in the smaller role of the self-dramatizingly gloomy Masha. DCP digital widescreen. (MR)

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